Mr Hyde (of Maoists) wakes up

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The efforts to forget political consensus among top three political parties in Nepal was going well (quotes of Maoist leaders):

The meeting ended on a positive note. The meeting was a step closer toward resolving the problem.

- Maoist leader Dev Gurung (on October 23)

We will show flexibility for the end of political deadlock.

- Maoist spokesperson Dinanath Sharma (on October 20)

And, all of the sudden, it seemed like all that was a child’s play (headlines of news on October 25):

New condition by Maoists: ‘Government under our leadership’

Maoist Vice-chair Narayankaji Shrestha said the proposal for a Maoist-led government is not a new one. “We have been demanding it for long.

(from myrepublica.com)

So what changed all of the sudden?

At least for an ordinary citizen, nothing (the leaders could have talked secretly to many things that we were unaware of). If nothing had changed in these few days, why the Maoists become Mr. Hyde?

The Maoists have proved they are not very good at the politics of bargaining (otherwise how could a party that could form a government under their leadership fail to elect their candidates in the post of president, vice-president and speaker!) Had they realized during all those meetings, they were being dominated by?

I don’t know that but if Maoists decide to launch a nationwide movement against the government, it could be a bad decision. If they fail… Then what next?

Even if they return to the talks, it would make nothing other than making their image childish! (but that would be a good choice at least for the country, I believe).

[Note: Mr Hyde as in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson]

Author: Ujjwal Acharya

The Radiant Star is a personal blog of Ujjwal Acharya, born 1978, who likes to call himself a professional journalist, hobbyist blogger, sport lover and social media enthusiastic. This blog features personal posts with opinions on media, citizen journalism and blogs of Nepal and tweets at @UjjwalAcharya

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  1. Pingback: Global Voices Online » Nepal: What Next?

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